A Death in the Family

A Death in the Family


Introduction by: Steve Earle

Format
Ebook
Price
$12.99
 
Additional Formats
  • Ebook
  • ISBN 9781440641794
  • 320 Pages
  • Penguin Classics
  • Adult

Overview

Forty years after its original publication, James Agee’s last novel seems, more than ever, an American classic. For in his lyrical, sorrowful account of a man’s death and its impact on his family, Agee painstakingly created a small world of domestic happiness and then showed how quickly and casually it could be destroyed.

On a sultry summer night in 1915, Jay Follet leaves his house in Knoxville, Tennessee, to tend to his father, whom he believes is dying. The summons turns out to be a false alarm, but on his way back to his family, Jay has a car accident and is killed instantly. Dancing back and forth in time and braiding the viewpoints of Jay’s wife, brother, and young son, Rufus, Agee creates an overwhelmingly powerful novel of innocence, tenderness, and loss that should be read aloud for the sheer music of its prose.

"An utterly individual and original book…one of the most deeply worked out expressions of human feeling that I have ever read."–Alfred Kazin, New York Times Book Review

"It is, in the full sense, poetry….The language of the book, at once luminous and discreet…remains in the mind."–New Republic

"People I know who read A Death in the Family forty years ago still talk about it. So do I. It is a great book, and I’m happy to see it done anew."–Andre Dubus, author of Dancing After Hours and Meditations From A Moveable Chair

Praise

“[James Agee’s words] are so indelibly etched someplace inside of me that I couldn’t reach to rub them out even if I wanted to. And I never want to.”
-Steve Earle, from the Introduction

“The work of a writer whose power with English words can make you gasp.”
-Alfred Kazin, The New York Times Book Review

” It is, in the full sense, poetry. . . . The language of the book, at once luminous and discreet . . . remains in the mind.”
-The New Republic

” Wonderfully alive.”
-The New Yorker
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