A Patriot's History of the United States

A Patriot’s History of the United States

From Columbus’s Great Discovery to the War on Terror


Format
Paperback
Price
$25.00
 
Additional Formats
  • Paperback
  • ISBN 9781595230324
  • 960 Pages
  • Sentinel
  • Adult

Overview

For the past three decades, many history professors have allowed their biases to distort the way America’s past is taught. These intellectuals have searched for instances of racism, sexism, and bigotry in our history while downplaying the greatness of America’s patriots and the achievements of “dead white men.”

As a result, more emphasis is placed on Harriet Tubman than on George Washington; more about the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II than about D-Day or Iwo Jima; more on the dangers we faced from Joseph McCarthy than those we faced from Josef Stalin.

A Patriot’s History of the United States corrects those doctrinaire biases. In this groundbreaking book, America’s discovery, founding, and development are reexamined with an appreciation for the elements of public virtue, personal liberty, and private property that make this nation uniquely successful. This book offers a long-overdue acknowledgment of America’s true and proud history.

A Patriot's History of the United States

A Patriot’s History of the United States

Larry Schweikart, Michael Patrick Allen

Praise

In A Patriot’s History of the United States, Larry Schweikart and Michael Allen remind us what a few good individuals can do in just a few short centuries . . . . A fluid account of America from the discovery of the Continent up to the present day. (Brandon Miniter, The Wall Street Journal)

No recent American history challenges the conventional wisdom of academics as aggressively as Larry Schweikart and Michael Allen’s A Patriot’s History of the United States. (Daniel J. Flynn, Front Page Magazine)

There are a thousand pleasant surprises and heartening reminders that underneath it all America remains a country of ideas, ideals, and optimism—and no amount of revisionism can take that legacy away. (John Coleman, Humane Studies Review)

A welcome, refreshing, and solid contribution to relearning what we have forgotten and remembering why this nation is good, and worth defending. (Matthew Spalding, National Review

Table of Contents

Acknowledgments
Interview with Larry Schweikart as seen in The Limbaugh Letter
Introduction

Chapter One
The City on the Hill, 1492-1707

Chapter Two
Colonial Adolescence, 1707-63

Chapter Three
Colonies No More, 1763-83

Chapter Four
A Nation of Law, 1776-89

Chapter Five
Small Republic, Big Shoulders, 1789-1815

Chapter Six
The First Era of Big Central Government, 1815-36

Chapter Seven
Red Foxes and Bear Flags, 1836-48

Chapter Eight
The House Dividing, 1848-60

Chapter Nine
The Crisis of the Union, 1860-65

Chapter Ten
Ideals and Realities of Reconstruction, 1865-76

Chapter Eleven
Lighting Out for the Territories, 1861-90

Chapter Twelve
Sinews of Democracy, 1876-96

Chapter Thirteen
“Building Best, Building Greatly,” 1896-1912

Chapter Fourteen
War, Wilson, and Internationalism, 1912-20

Chapter Fifteen
The Roaring Twenties and the Great Crash, 1920-32

Chapter Sixteen
Enlarging the Public Sector, 1932-40
The New Deal: Immediate Goals, Unintended Results

Chapter Seventeen
Democracy’s Finest Hour, 1941-45

Chapter Eighteen
America’s “Happy Days,” 1946-59

Chapter Nineteen
The Age of Upheaval, 1960-74

Chapter Twenty
Retreat and Resurrection, 1974-88

Chapter Twenty-One
The Moral Crossroads, 1989-2000

Chapter Twenty-Two
America, World Leader, 2000 and Beyond

Conclusion
Notes
Selected Reading
Index

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