Teaching Right from Wrong

Teaching Right from Wrong

Forty Things you can do to Raise a Moral Child

Format
Paperback
Price
$16.00
 
  • Paperback
  • ISBN 9780425178225
  • 224 Pages
  • Berkley

Overview

Caring parents want to raise children who are kind, trustworthy, considerate and fair. But sometimes it seems like there’s no shortage of bad examples to lead them astray.

Based on sound psychological theory, drawing on current research—and most importantly, rooted in the real world that parents face today—this book shows how children develop a moral sensibility, and what parents can do to refine and reinforce it. Wise, warm, and thoroughly practical, this is an essential book for all loving parents—who want to raise loving children.

Parents will learn…

* How “ethical intelligence” can be nurtured—even in a child’s earliest years

* How television, religion, and peers can shape—or short-circuit—a child’s moral development

* How to recognize and avoid some of the most common errors parents make

Table of Contents

Preface

Introduction

Feelings: Emotions Are the Groundwork of Morality

1. Tune In to Your Children’s Feelings

2. Talk About How You Think Others May Be Feeling

3. Comment on Your Own Emotions

4. Sing to and Hold Your Children

5. Read Imaginative Stories to Your Children

Reason: Feelings Need to Be Guided By Reason

6. Give Reasons Why You Approve or Disapprove of Your Children’s Behavior

7. Provide Reasons for Rules You Want Your Children to Follow

8. Encourage Your Children to Play with Children of Various Ages

9. Engage Your Children in Reflective Discussions by Asking Open-Ended Questions

10. Promote Independent Thinking

Self-Esteem: Self-Respect Is a Prerequisite to Acting Morally

11. Treat Your Children with Respect

12. Express Interest in Your Children’s Activities, Projects, and Dreams

13. Help Set Goals and Encourage Your Children to See Them Through

14. Praise a Task Well Done

15. Give Your Children Emotional and Verbal Support to Stand Against the Crowd When Necessary

Discipline: Behavior Has Consequences

16. Be Flexible – Not Arbitrary – In Your Discipline

17. Don’t Use Intimidation; Never Use Ridicule

18. The Severity of the Punishment Should Be Related to the Severity of the Wrongdoing

19. Discipline with Explanations

20. Criticize in Private

Habits: Morality Is Learned Through Observation and Doing

21. Provide Opportunities for Your Children to Help Others

22. Give Positive Verbal and Nonverbal Feedback for Being a Good Person

23. Work with Your Children in Community and Volunteer Service

24. Expect and Encourage Good Deeds from Your Children

25. Help Your Children Keep Promises

Prejudice: Treating All People Fairly Is Fundamental to Morality

26. Examine Your Own Biases

27. Provide Examples That Counteract Society’s Prejudices

28. Don’t Allow Biased or Bigoted Comments to Go Unchallenged

29. Give Your Children Books That Show Different Kinds of People Playing, Working, and Living Together

30. Talk About Differences Between People, but Talk About Them Neutrally

Values: Some Values Are More Important Than Others

31. Tell Your Children About the People You Admire and Why

32. Live Your Life As You Want Your Children to Lead Theirs

33. Show the Importance of Protecting the Vulnerable

34. Comment on Compassionate Behavior – Let Your Children Know That Caring Is an Important Value

35. Let Your Children Know What You Value and Why You Value It

Community: Morality Is Social

36. Supervise Your Children’s Television Viewing

37. Get Involved with Your Children’s Education

38. Make Family Meals Important and Regular Occasions

39. Make Time for Your Children

40. Take an Interest in the World Outside Your Home

Afterword

Selected References

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