The Unfinished Global Revolution

The Unfinished Global Revolution

The Road to International Cooperation

Format
Paperback
Price
$16.00
 
Additional Formats
  • Paperback
  • ISBN 9780143120834
  • 288 Pages
  • Penguin Books
  • Adult

Overview

In The Unfinished Global Revolution, former United Nations Deputy Secretary General Mark Malloch-Brown diagnoses the central global predicament of the twenty-first century—as we have become more integrated, we have also become less governed. National governments are no longer equipped to address complex global issues, from climate change to poverty, and international organizations have not yet been empowered to step into the breach. In this book, Malloch-Brown wrenches the discussion away from terrorism, nationalism and Iraq and calls for a new global politics—a bigger league, with greater opportunity for all.

Beneath a spotlight rarely reserved for public servants, Malloch-Brown has been at the center of recent world events: at the World Bank, when it was under siege from activists; as a political consultant to aspiring democratic leaders and governments; and at the United Nations, where he fought off conservative critics who turned on Kofi Annan after the Iraq war. In The Unfinished Global Revolution, he draws on his experiences at the frontlines of international development over the past several decades—from Cambodia to Sudan, and from Washington to the UN headquarters—in order to provide a personal, on-the-ground view of seemingly abstract challenges.
 
The Unfinished Global Revolution chronicles how over the past few decades domestic problems—from unemployment to environmental distress—increasingly have international roots. As national politicians lose control to impersonal global forces, they will be forced to become more effective participants in international mechanisms like the United Nations that may offer the only viable solutions. Increasingly, ad hoc arrangements between NGOs, civil society and the private sector are filling in the gap created by the failures of individual governments.

In the wake of the worldwide economic crisis of 2008, many have been forced to acknowledge that a global economy needs global institutions to govern it. What is true for finance, Malloch-Brown argues, is surely true for public health, poverty, or climate change. In The Unfinished Global Revolution, he calls for us to embrace more powerful international institutions and the values needed to underpin a truly globalist agenda—the rule of law, human rights, and opportunity for all.

Praise

What is attractive about Malloch Brown’s book is the combination of detail, authority and humility derived from decades of trying to make international co-operation work…What emerges is a nuanced and largely realistic picture, showing that building effective institutions involves political nous as well as multilateral pieties, Texas stubbornness as much as Washington suavity.”
– THE FINANCIAL TIMES
“Rich in both analysis and recommendations, Mark Malloch-Brown deploys his enormous talent and shrewd understanding of the forces that are shaping our world to argue for stronger, more inclusive global institutions. Drawing from a wealth of personal experience on the frontlines of world affairs, Mark’s book is authentic, compelling and immensely enjoyable. His message should resonate in national and international discourse for years to come.”
– Kofi A. Annan, United Nations Secretary-General (1997-2006)
“The clash that will really matter, contends Mark Malloch Brown in this admirable book, is between international co-operation and old-fashioned nationalism…With every international agreement to reduce poverty, regulate finance, combat terrorism or protect the environment, we may be moving, tortoise-like, towards the global revolution he advocates so eloquently.”
– THE ECONOMIST
“A personal, frontline view of the most pressing issues of our time…The Unfinished Global Revolution introduces a revolutionary ‘simple global social contract’ through which individuals, corporations, and governments can effectively cooperate and establish more powerful international institutions.”
– THE DAILY BEAST
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