Newsroom

This football season seems to be more about the troubling behavior of the players than on the game itself. Mark Edmundson, author of Why Football Matters, takes on the controversy and more in his interview with NPR's The Takeaway.
World Order by Henry Kissinger "could not be more timely" praises Michiko Kakutani in the New York Times. On the cover of the New York Times Book Review, John Micklethwait writes, "If you worry about a globe spinning out of control, then World Order is for you. It brings together history, geography, modern politics and no small amount of passion…it is a book that every member of Congress should be locked in a room with—and forced to read before taking the oath of office.” More on Kissinger's important new book can be found in this interview with Susan Page of USA Today.
Betty Halbreich, legendary personal shopper at Bergdorf Goodman, inks her mark with memoir I'll Drink to That: A Life in Style, with a Twist. “Charming… an inspirational feminist tale,” says People and "tart, funny," writes Entertainment Weekly.  Read more about Betty from New York and Vanity Fair.
Vanessa Manko's The Invention of Exile is on the short list for this year's Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel Prize. The 2014 winner will be announced on December 9 at The Center for Fiction’s Annual Benefit and Awards Dinner in New York City.
Hillary Rodham Clinton reviews Henry Kissinger's World Order for The Washington Post. She says, "[World Order] is vintage Kissinger, with his singular combination of breadth and acuity along with his knack for connecting headlines to trend lines....A real national dialogue is the only way we’re going to rebuild a political consensus to take on the perils and the promise of the 21st century. Henry Kissinger’s book makes a compelling case for why we have to do it and how we can succeed."
We here at Penguin are heartbroken to learn that our beloved author Joan Rivers has passed away. She was groundbreaking, she was hilarious, she was fierce…and she was part of our big Penguin family. Our thoughts are with Joan’s daughter Melissa and her grandson Cooper, her family and friends, and all of those around the world who were touched by her humor, her big heart, and her extraordinary generosity of spirit. Rest in peace, Joan, and thanks for all the laughs.
Mark Edmundson, author of Why Football Matters, discusses the good (and bad) of football on PBS NewsHour.
The Most Dangerous Book by Kevin Birmingham is called "a grand, readable adventure story" by Rachel Shteir in The New York Times Book Review. Read her full assessment here.

Alexander Chee gives Everything I Never Told You by Celeste Ng a wonderful review in The New York Times Book Review. He says, “If we know this story, we haven’t seen it yet in American fiction, not until now…Ng has set two tasks in this novel’s doubled heart—to be exciting, and to tell a story bigger than whatever is behind the crime. She does both by turning the nest of familial resentments into at least four smaller, prickly mysteries full of secrets the family members won’t share…What emerges is a deep, heartfelt portrait of a family struggling with its place in history, and a young woman hoping to be the fulfillment of that struggle. This is, in the end, a novel about the burden of being the first of your kind—a burden you do not always survive.”

Vanessa Manko, author of The Invention of Exile, writes about her grandfather's exile in "Forgotten Postcards from Mexico City," an essay in The New York Times Magazine. Read her story here.