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The longlists for the 2015 PEN Literary Awards were announced this week and feature 8 authors and their books published by Penguin Publishing Group imprints, as follows: PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize for Debut Fiction: PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award: PEN Open Book Award: PEN/Jacqueline Bograd Weld Award for Biography:
  • Victoria by A.N. Wilson (Penguin Press)
PEN/ESPN Award for Literary Sports Writing: PEN Translation Prize:
  • I Ching  by John Minford (Viking Books)
Congratulations to all of our nominees. View the complete 2015 PEN Literary Awards Longlists here. The awards finalists will be announced on April 15. The winners will be revealed on May 13 and honored at PEN’s Literary Awards Ceremony on June 8 at the New School in New York.
David Esptein, the New York Times bestselling author of The Sport’s Gene, wrote a wonderful Op-Ed in the NYT on the perils of youth sports, noting how “heightened pressure on child athletes to be, essentially, adult athletes has fostered an epidemic of hyperspecialization that is both dangerous and counterproductive.” He’ll also be on NPR’s TED Hour on Friday, July 18.
PENGUIN GROUP (USA) HAS 7 BOOKS ON THE 2014 PEN LITERARY AWARDS LONGLISTS The 2014 PEN Literary Awards Longlists were announced this week and 7 books published by Penguin Group (USA) are in the running for the following awards: image PEN/Monstein-Spiel Vogel Award for the Art of the Essay: PEN/O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award: PEN Open Book Award: PEN/Jacqueline Bogard Weld Award for Biography: image  
  • Wilson by A. Scott Berg (Putnam)
PEN/ESPN Award for Literary Sports Writing: PEN/Steven Kroll Award for Picture Book Writing: Penguin Random House has a total of 16 titles on the 2014 PEN Literary Awards Longlists, all of which can be viewed here. The 2014 PEN Literary Awards Shortlists will be announced on June 17.  Winners will be named on July 30 and awards presented at the PEN ceremony in New York on September 29.  
Current author David Epistein’s March TED talk, based on his New York Times bestselling books, The Sports Genereleased this week by Current in paperback, addresses this question: Are athletes really getting faster, better stronger? When you look at sporting achievements over the last decades, it seems like human have gotten faster, better and stronger in nearly every way. Yet as Epstein points out in this delightfully counter-intuitive talk, it becomes clear that many factors are at play in shattering athletic records, and the development of natural talents is just one of them.