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Extreme Medicine by Kevin Fong is named a finalist for the AAAS/Subaru SB&F Prize for Excellence in Science Books, which celebrates outstanding science writing and illustration for children and young adults. The awards committee writes: “Fong’s strong narrative voice and his belief that medical discovery is akin to extreme geographical exploration bring the reader fully into a discussion of science, medical practice, and innovation.  He offers compelling stories of doctors and patients that include just enough detail to contextualize and educate without overwhelming. His passion for his work as a doctor and his clear compassion for the ill (or harmed) shows in every case he describes. His curiosity taps the reader’s curiosity. And, more than anything else, the unanswered questions invite young readers into the challenge of charting the future path of medicine.” Winners will be announced in January 2015.
Leon Panetta holds nothing back in Worthy Fights. Check out his revelatory interviews on NPR’s Morning Edition, NBC’s The Today Show, MSNBC’s Andrea Mitchell Reports, CNN with Gloria Borger, and FOX News Channel’s The O’Reilly Factor.
Sheila Weller, author of The News Sorority, discusses the surprise response seen at the release of her book with The New York Times. A must-read, Bloomberg Businessweek claims it will surely “be catnip to TV obsessives and people in the news business.”
The National Book Foundation has announced its 9th annual “5 Under 35” honorees and three of the authors are published by Penguin Publishing Group imprints: Five-Under-35-ThumbnailView the complete list of 2014 honorees here. This year’s “5 Under 35” authors will be honored at the National Book Awards Week party in DUMBO, Brooklyn on Monday, November 17. The event will be hosted by Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson, musical director for The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon. New Yorker editor Ben Greenman will moderate a conversation with the authors and serve as the evening’s Guest DJ. Riverhead’s Rosie Schaap, author of Drinking with Men: A Memoir, is the Guest Bartender. The “5 Under 35” program annually honors five young fiction writers selected by past National Book Award winners and finalists. Since 2006, the program has championed a rising generation of writers, including Penguin Random House authors Danielle Evans, Keith Gessen, Nam Le, Dinaw Mengestu, Téa Obreht, Karen Russell, Merritt Tierce, Claire Vaye Watkins, Tiphanie Yanique and Paul Yu.
This football season seems to be more about the troubling behavior of the players than on the game itself. Mark Edmundson, author of Why Football Matters, takes on the controversy and more in his interview with NPR’s The Takeaway.
World Order by Henry Kissinger “could not be more timely” praises Michiko Kakutani in the New York Times. On the cover of the New York Times Book Review, John Micklethwait writes, “If you worry about a globe spinning out of control, then World Order is for you. It brings together history, geography, modern politics and no small amount of passion…it is a book that every member of Congress should be locked in a room with—and forced to read before taking the oath of office.” More on Kissinger’s important new book can be found in this interview with Susan Page of USA Today.
Betty Halbreich, legendary personal shopper at Bergdorf Goodman, inks her mark with memoir I’ll Drink to That: A Life in Style, with a Twist. “Charming… an inspirational feminist tale,” says People and “tart, funny,” writes Entertainment Weekly.  Read more about Betty from New York and Vanity Fair.
Vanessa Manko’s The Invention of Exile is on the short list for this year’s Flaherty-Dunnan First Novel Prize. The 2014 winner will be announced on December 9 at The Center for Fiction’s Annual Benefit and Awards Dinner in New York City.
Hillary Rodham Clinton reviews Henry Kissinger’s World Order for The Washington Post. She says, “[World Order] is vintage Kissinger, with his singular combination of breadth and acuity along with his knack for connecting headlines to trend lines….A real national dialogue is the only way we’re going to rebuild a political consensus to take on the perils and the promise of the 21st century. Henry Kissinger’s book makes a compelling case for why we have to do it and how we can succeed.”
Mark Edmundson, author of Why Football Matters, discusses the good (and bad) of football on PBS NewsHour.