PENGUIN ANNOUNCES 2011 RESULTS

Record profits despite toughest trading conditions in a generation

New York, New York, February 27, 2012 … Penguin, the international publishing company, today announced its 2011 results reporting sales of £1,062m and operating profit of £113m, representing underlying growth of 1% and 8% respectively. The company gained share in its three largest markets, the US, UK and Australia, despite very demanding trading conditions and the collapse of two important customers, Borders and the REDgroup. These outstanding results were the product of great publishing across the board at Penguin; continued growth at DK, helped by its unique licensing program; and a continued emphasis on product and channel profitability.

These results were part of Pearson's 2011 results announcement. For the Pearson press release please click here.

Penguin Chairman and CEO John Makinson, said: "This is the most turbulent book market that anyone can remember. In spite of this, we have increased both our sales and our profits. This remarkable achievement has been driven by excellent publishing around the globe, demonstrated by market share growth in our three biggest markets, and innovation in every aspect of our digital publishing."

Penguin Group (USA) CEO David Shanks said, "Penguin US had another successful year. We increased our sales, profits and margins, with contributions from every division of the company, despite the collapse of Borders and other marketplace challenges. Our eBook sales doubled, we expanded our digital publishing programs, and we won a Pulitzer Prize for the second year in a row. We had more bestsellers than we've ever had in a single year. We maximized the success of our brand name authors while discovering and launching the careers of new writers. Penguin's backlist continued to do well. Our long-running imprint strategy again yielded good results, with our newest imprint, Blue Rider Press, landing three books on The New York Times bestselling books in its first season. Our Young Readers division had an outstanding year. And strategic investments in new processes improved our overall efficiency. Looking ahead, we have an exceptional 2012 publishing list."

In 2011, Penguin US's books and authors continued to win awards, find new readers, and shape the national conversation, while articulating the human experience and entertaining people everywhere. The company discovers and nurtures its authors and distributes its books widely across all formats (physical, digital, and audio), and Penguin's ongoing partnership between writers and readers remains healthy.

Performance Highlights

In 2011, Penguin Group (USA):
  • Increased sales
  • Increased profits
  • Doubled eBook revenues
  • Continued success of imprint strategy with the launch of Blue Rider Press
  • Broadened its international reach through expanded partnership with Brazil's Companhia das Letras and more Spanish language publishing
  • Won the Pulitzer Prize as well as other awards
  • Increased the number of The New York Times bestsellers once again
    • Young Readers increased market share and The New York Times bestsellers
    • The imprint G. P. Putnam's Sons led the industry in hardcover bestsellers
    • Berkley/NAL led the industry in mass market bestsellers
  • Maximized brand name authors
  • Discovered and published new bestselling authors
  • Contributed to national conversations
  • Delivered strong results across core imprints
  • Continued growth across its niche imprints
  • Extended digital publishing programs with new products, new platforms, and new partnerships
  • David Shanks honored as PW's "Person of the Year"
  • Looking ahead
  • Penguin worldwide

1. Increased sales

Penguin Group (USA) increased its sales across all imprints, despite an uncertain economy and industry challenges, with particularly strong results from the Young Readers division. Penguin published new books from such bestselling authors as Tom Clancy, Patricia Cornwell, Nora Roberts, Harlan Coben, Catherine Coulter, John Sandford, Clive Cussler, Charlaine Harris, Tami Hoag, Sue Grafton, John Grisham, Eric Carle and Sarah Dessen, among many others. And Penguin put many debut authors on bestseller lists across the country: Deborah Harkness, Amor Towles, Eleanor Brown, and Ruta Sepetys. The ongoing strength and resiliency in the marketplace of The Help by Kathryn Stockett and Ken Follett's books contributed to the company's performance. Penguin's extensive backlist, which includes such perennial favorites as Of Mice and Men and Lord of the Flies, also contributed to the company's good results.

2. Increased profits

Penguin's increase in profits in 2011 was driven by strong book sales across the company and fueled by strategic investments in new technology, the internal development and training in new tools, and improvements in business processes. With programs such as digital workflow, Penguin CORE, an in-house media suite, satellite media tours, and new title management systems, Penguin continued to produce high-quality products ever more efficiently.

3. Doubled eBook revenues

eBook revenues doubled in the U.S. in 2011. The Help by Kathryn Stockett sold five times as many ebook units across all accounts in 2011 as it did in 2010.

In 2011, Nora Roberts and Charlaine Harris each passed a million eBook units sold for all their titles across all accounts.

Our eBooks sold well across a wide range of genres and subjects, from romance and thrillers to literary fiction and serious nonfiction. The reach of eBooks has expanded; we recently sold our first eBook in Antarctica.

4. Continued success of imprint strategy with the launch of Blue Rider Press

Penguin Group (USA)'s successful imprint strategy continued in 2011 with the launch of Blue Rider Press, David Rosenthal's new imprint.

Blue Rider Press had three of its first four titles become The New York Times bestsellers: The End of Normal by Stephanie Madoff Mack, The New New Rules by Bill Maher, and Goodnight iPad by Ann Droyd (the pseudonym for award-winning children's author David Milgrim). Headed by president and publisher David Rosenthal, Blue Rider is an eclectic, innovative new imprint, focusing on books in a variety of areas, chosen by Rosenthal and his staff for their commercial and literary qualities—and each notable for Blue Rider's specific vision of how these titles can be successfully published in this uncertain time.

5. Broadened its international reach through expanded partnership with Brazil's Companhia das Letras and more Spanish language publishing

In 2011, Penguin acquired a 45 percent interest in Companhia das Letras, a highly regarded Latin American publishing house. Founded by Luiz Schwarcz in 1986, Companhia das Letras has just celebrated its twenty-fifth year. In its twenty-five year history it has published nearly 3,500 titles by 1,300 authors, with a primary focus on maintaining an editorial line based on quality — of both the writing and design — raising the bar for Brazilian publishing.

In 2010, Penguin launched the successful Penguin Classics partnership to publish in Portuguese for the Brazilian market with Companhia. We now have 35 titles in print under the Penguin Companhia Classicos imprint. The expanded partnership is a natural extension of Penguin and Companhia's common values and experience working together.

C. A. Press, Penguin Group (USA)'s new Spanish-language imprint, led by publisher Carlos Azula, focuses on current events, novels, and cookbooks, as well as inspirational and self-help books, for readers in the United States, Puerto Rico, Latin America, and the Caribbean. C. A. Press successfully launched its first titles in 2011. Ciudadania Americana, a guide to the US Citizenship Test, includes an audio CD, allowing readers to practice their pronunciation and learn more about the test, and became the #1 selling Spanish title at Walmart. C. A. Press also introduced a new children's bilingual series called Ladybird Read It Yourself.

6. Won the Pulitzer Prize and other awards

Penguin Group (USA) won a Pulitzer Prize for the fifth time in the last seven years, with Washington: A Life by Ron Chernow winning the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for Biography. Penguin had two National Book Awards finalists: Viking's Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention by Manning Marable in the Nonfiction category and Dial Books for Young Readers' Chime by Franny Billingsley in the Young People's Literature category. Other awards included:

  • The Los Angeles Times /Art Seidenbaum Award for First Fiction: House of Tomorrow by Peter Bognanni (Amy Einhorn Books/Putnam, Berkley)
  • The Hurston/Wright Legacy Award for Fiction: Before You Suffocate Your Own Fool Self by Danielle Evans (Riverhead)
  • Grammy Award for Best Spoken Word Album: If You Ask Me (And Of Course You Won't) by Betty White (Penguin Audio)
  • The French-American Foundation and the Florence Gould Foundation Translation Prize: Lydia Davis, for her translation of Gustave Flaubert's Madame Bovary (Viking/Penguin)
  • The Publishing Innovation Award, sponsored by Constellation, for Best Fiction App: Atlas Shrugged by Ayn Rand
  • The NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work—Fiction: Terry McMillan, Getting to Happy (Viking/NAL)
  • The James Beard Foundation Book Award: Four Fish by Paul Greenberg (The Penguin Press)
  • The PEN/W.G. Sebald Award for a Fiction Writer in Mid-Career for Aleksandar Hemon, whose most recent works are The Lazarus Project and Love and Obstacles (Riverhead)
  • The Grand Master Lifetime Achievement Award from the Mystery Writers of America (MWA) at the 2011 Edgar Awards: G. P. Putnam's Sons author Sara Paretsky
  • The International Thriller Writers Award for Best Hardcover Novel: Bad Blood by John Sandford (G. P. Putnam's Sons)
  • The Agatha Award for Best First Novel: The Long Quiche Goodbye by Avery Aames (Berkley Prime Crime)
  • The Laura Ingalls Wilder Award from the American Library Association: Tomie dePaola, for the Penguin Young Readers author's substantial and lasting contribution to literature for children
  • la médaille de Vermeil de la Ville de Paris, also known as The French Medal of Honor: Dutton bestselling author Harlan Coben
  • The Dayton Literary Peace Prize for Fiction: The Surrendered by Chang-rae Lee (Riverhead).
  • The Ernest J. Gaines Award for Literary Excellence: How to Read the Air by Dinaw Mengestu (Riverhead)
  • The New York Public Library's 2011 Helen Bernstein Award for Excellence in Journalism: The Watchers by Shane Harris (The Penguin Press)
  • The Kennedy Center/Stephen Sondheim Inspirational Teacher Award: Rafe Esquith, the bestselling Viking/Penguin author of Teach Like Your Hair's On Fire andLighting Their Fires
  • The Audie Award for Solo Narration—Male: Zorgamazoo by Robert Paul Weston, read by Alan Cumming (Penguin Audio)

7. More The New York Times bestsellers than ever before

Penguin Group (USA) had more The New York Times bestsellers in 2011 than any previous year with 254.

  • Young Readers increased market share and The New York Times bestsellers
    Penguin Young Readers Group had 41 The New York Times bestsellers in 2011, an all-time high for the children's division. Contributing to this success and market share growth were new titles from bestselling authors, several notable debuts, and backlist titles. In 2011, Penguin Young Readers group published books by Eric Carle, John Grisham, Ally Condie, Jan Brett, Tomie de Paola, Anna Dewdney, Andrea Cremer, Judy Schachner, Jay Asher, John Bemelmans Marciano, Richelle Mead, Sarah Dessen, John Flanagan, Ruta Sepety, Elizabeth Berkley, Harlan Coben, Meg Wolitzer, Maile Meloy, and many others.
  • The imprint G. P. Putnam's Sons led the industry in hardcover bestsellers
    G. P. Putnam's Sons had an industry-leading 34 The New York Times hardcover bestsellers, more than any individual hardcover imprint, an accomplishment Putnam has achieved every year for more than 25 years. In 2011, Putnam published bestsellers from Tom Clancy, Patricia Cornwell, Katherine Stockett, Robert B. Parker, Clive Cussler, Nora Roberts, J.D. Robb, John Sandford, Sue Grafton, Robert Crais, Betty White, Catherine Coulter, Stuart Woods, Amanda Quick, Alex Berenson, W.E.B. Griffin, Jayne Ann Krentz, and many others.
  • Berkley/NAL Led the Industry in mass market bestsellers
    Berkley/NAL continued to be the #1 mass market publisher in the industry, while also publishing bestsellers in hardcover and trade paperback, with 73 The New York Times mass market bestsellers. In 2011, Berkley/NAL published books by Charlaine Harris, Laurell K. Hamilton, Jim Butcher, Anne Bishop, Catherine Anderson, Victoria Laurie, Nalini Singh, Patricia Briggs, Jen Lancaster, J.R. Ward, Sarah Blake, Karen White, Chloe Neill, and many others.

8. Maximized brand name authors

Penguin Group (USA) published many of the biggest selling books of 2011 in the U.S. market. The Group continued to successfully execute its strategy of maximizing multimillion—copy books and authors. Here are highlights:

  • The Help by Kathryn Stockett continued to be a huge bestseller, selling more than 10 million copies across all formats to date and sold five times as many ebook units across all accounts in 2011 as it did in 2010. The debut novel was a #1 The New York Times hardcover fiction bestseller in 2009 and last year the trade paperback edition held the #1 slot on The New York Times trade paperback fiction bestseller list for 27 weeks while also topping the hardcover and paperback (combined), and print and eBook (combined) The New York Times bestseller lists. The Disney/DreamWorks film based on The Help has been a box office blockbuster and earned won major Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild Awards, and is nominated for Best Picture as well as three other Academy Awards.
  • Tom Clancy had three The New York Times bestsellers: Locked On, Against All Enemies, and Dead or Alive. Both Against All Enemies and Dead or Alive were #1 on The New York Times hardcover fiction bestseller list. Locked On debuted at #1 on The New York Times eBook fiction bestseller list.
  • Patricia Cornwell's Red Mist, the 19th Kay Scarpetta novel, debuted at #1 on The New York Times eBook fiction and combined print and eBook fiction bestseller lists and was also a The New York Times hardcover fiction bestseller. The mass market edition of the #1 The New York Times bestseller Port Mortuary also spent six weeks on the bestseller list, peaking at #2.
  • Ken Follett's Fall of Giants, book one of the Century Trilogy, was a The New York Times bestseller in both trade paperback and hardcover in 2011. The trade paperback, published by NAL September 2011, a stayed on The New York Times paperback bestseller list for 10 weeks. Pillars Of The Earth has remained in Penguin's top 5 selling ebooks overall since it was published in 2007. We now have more than 21 million copies of Follett's books in print in all formats.
  • Nora Roberts had ten The New York Times bestsellers across all formats, including four #1s. Every book Roberts has penned in the last twenty years has hit The New York Times bestseller list.
  • Sue Grafton's V is for Vengeance, the 22nd installment in her Kinsey Millhone alphabet series, was on The New York Times hardcover fiction bestseller list for six weeks and was among the top selling titles during the 2011 holiday season.
  • Harlan Coben hit #1 on The New York Times hardcover fiction bestseller list for the fourth year in a row, with Live Wire, his 10th Myron Bolitar novel, which was also #1 on The New York Times combined print and eBook fiction bestseller list. Coben also had two The New York Times mass market bestsellers. Shelter, Coben's first young adult novel from Putnam Books for Young Readers, stars Mickey Bolitar the nephew of Myron Bolitar. Shelter debuted at #2 on The New York Times bestseller list in September.
  • Charlaine Harris's Dead Reckoning debuted at #1 on The New York Times hardcover fiction bestseller list, remaining in the top slot for four weeks and staying on that list for ten weeks overall. The Sookie Stackhouse Companion and Dead in the Family were also The New York Times bestsellers for Harris. The Sookie Stackhouse series, the basis for HBO's popular True Blood series, has more than 20 million copies of the eleven books in print across multiple formats.
  • John Sandford's Shock Wave was the first Virgil Flowers novel to debut at #1 on The New York Times hardcover fiction bestseller list. Buried Prey, his 22nd Prey novel, debuted at #2 on The New York Times hardcover fiction bestseller list as well as #2 on The New York Times the eBook fiction list, and on the combined print and eBook fiction bestseller lists.
  • Clive Cussler had ten The New York Times bestsellers in 2011. He hit #1 on The New York Times hardcover fiction bestseller list with The Jungle, the first of Cussler's eight Oregon Files series books to top this list. Cussler's The Kingdom, a Fargo Adventure, hit #2 on The New York Times hardcover fiction bestseller list, and Devil's Gate, a Numa Files novel, also hit that list. In addition, Cussler had five The New York Times mass market bestsellers.
  • Laurell K. Hamilton debuted at #1 on The New York Times hardcover fiction bestseller list with Hit List, the 20th installment in her Anita Blake, Vampire Hunter series. Guilty Pleasures, the first book in Hamilton's series, was published by Ace as a mass market original in 1993. Over the course of nineteen subsequent books, Berkley has grown the Anita Blake books into a #1 bestselling hardcover series.
  • Tami Hoag has been called by the Chicago Tribune "One of the most intense suspense writers around." Since joining Dutton and launching her Oak Knoll series, all three of her books, Deeper than the Dead, Secrets to the Grave, and Down the Darkest Road have hit The New York Times bestseller list.
  • J. R. Ward's latest Black Dagger Brotherhood novel, Lover Unleashed(NAL), debuted at #2 on The New York Times hardcover fiction bestseller list. Dark Lover, the first book in the series, was published as a mass market original in 2005. With the third book in the series, Ward hit The New York Times list for the first time. Every book published in the series since then has landed high on The New York Times list, including three hardcover bestsellers.
  • Robert Crais tied his career-high position in 2011 on The New York Times hardcover fiction bestseller list, hitting #2 with The Sentry, the latest gritty noir thriller in his acclaimed Joe Pike/Elvis Cole series. In February 2012, Taken reached #1 on The New York Times hardcover fiction list for the first time in Crais' career.
  • Julie Garwood's first book with Dutton, The Ideal Man, debuted at #2 on The New York Times bestseller list. That book debuted higher and stayed on the printed list longer than she had been in decades. Dutton also released 10 of Garwood's backlist titles as eBooks for the first time and have sold over 100,000 copies of those books.
  • Catherine Coulter's Split Second, the latest novel in her bestselling FBI series, was on The New York Times bestseller list in July and was selected by Kroger as a July 2011 Book of the Month. This past November, her historical novel, Prince of Ravenscar, hit the extended The New York Times hardcover fiction list at #23.
  • W.E.B. Griffin, once again, wrote two new hardcover adventures this year. The summer's Victory and Honor: An Honor Bound Novel debuted at #4 on The New York Times hardcover fiction bestseller list, and December's Covert Warriors: A Presidential Agent Novel rose to #14 on that list.
  • Stuart Woods had four The New York Times bestselling crime novels in 2011. Strategic Moves, released in January, Bel-Air Dead, published in April, Son of Stone, published in September, and D.C. Dead, released in December, all featured his trademark hero, Stone Barrington.

In Young Readers

  • John Grisham had two #1 The New York Times bestsellers in the same week with Theodore Boone: The Abduction, which debuted at #1 on The New York Times chapter book bestseller list, and Theodore Boone: Kid Lawyer, which hit #1 on the children's paperback list.
  • Jay Asher's Thirteen Reasons Why was released in paperback for the first time in June and debuted at #1 on The New York Times children's paperback book bestseller list where it remains in its 32nd week. The hardcover edition spent 65 weeks on The New York Times children's chapter book bestseller list.
  • Sarah Dessen's What Happened to Goodbye hit #2 on The New York Times children's chapter book bestseller list, and the paperback of her Along for the Ride was on The New York Times children's paperback book bestseller list for 13 weeks.
  • Anna Dewdney had three The New York Times picture book bestsellers in 2011: Llama Llama Home with Mama debuted at #1 on The New York Times children's picture books bestseller list and remained on the list for 10 weeks; the original Llama Llama picture book Llama Llama Red Pajama hit the bestseller list for the first time after it was the featured title for this year's Read for the Record campaign; and Llama Llama Holiday Drama reappeared on The New York Times list for the holiday season.
  • Eric Carle's The Very Hungry Caterpillar led Penguin Young Readers Group's intensive backlist promotional campaign in March. Carle's The Artist Who Painted a Blue Horse, his first new book in four years, was a The New York Times bestseller for Philomel Books in October.
  • Harlan Coben launched his first YA series starring Mickey Bolitar, nephew of his popular adult novel character Myron Bolitar. Shelter (Putnam Books for Young Readers) became a The New York Times bestseller, debuting at #2 on the children's chapter books list.
  • Ally Condie's second consecutive The New York Times bestseller was Crossed (Dutton Children's Books), the highly-anticipated follow up to her The New York Times bestselling debut novel Matched, which was a #1 The New York Times children's paperback bestseller for Speak in the fall. The two books were simultaneously on their respective lists for five consecutive weeks, and Matched has remained on the list into 2012.
  • Richelle Mead, following the #1 New York Times-bestselling, multi-million copies sold success of her Vampire Academy series, launched a new teen series set in the same world as Vampire Academy. Bloodlines (Razorbill), the first book in the new series, was an instant The New York Times bestseller.

9. Discovered and successfully launched new authors

In 2011, Penguin Group (USA) introduced readers to a number of new authors whose books hit The New York Times bestseller lists

  • A Discovery of Witches by Deborah Harkness (Viking). The first novel in the All Soul's Trilogy by an award winning University of Southern California history professor went back to press three times in its first week on sale in February and debuted at #2 on The New York Times hardcover fiction bestseller list, where it stayed for eight weeks. The book generated rave reviews from traditional media as well as online media outlets and along the author's national book tour.
  • Rules of Civility by Amor Towles (Viking) was a The New York Times bestselling, widely heralded literary debut by a principal at an investment firm in Manhattan. The book made nine "Best Fiction of 2011" lists from The Wall Street Journal's to The Atlantic's to Amazon's. Published over seven months ago and still selling strong, it remains on The Los Angeles Times ' list.
  • The Weird Sisters by Eleanor Brown (Amy Einhorn Books/Putnam) was a successful debut novel in 2011, hitting The New York Times hardcover fiction bestseller list and earning rave reviews in many major publications. It was chosen by Amazon as one of its "Best Books of 2011." For the third year in a row, Amy Einhorn Books has had a debut bestseller, following 2010's The Postmistress by Sarah Blake and the 2009 debut of The Help by Kathryn Stockett.
  • Between Shades of Gray by Ruta Sepetys (Philomel) debuted at #8 on The New York Times children's chapter books bestseller list. It was a The New York Times Notable Children's Book of 2011, a Book-of-the-Month Club Blue Ribbon Selection (the first time a YA novel has been chosen), a Wall Street Journal Best Children's Book, a The New York Times Notable Book, an ALA Notable Book, a Publishers Weekly Best Children's Book of 2011, a School Library Journal Best Book of 2011, a Booklist Best Book of 2011, and a Kirkus Best Book of 2011. Sepetys was also awarded the Prix RTL-Lire, a French prize for the best novel for young people, for Between Shades of Gray, the first time an American has received this honor.

10. Contributed to National Conversations

Penguin Group (USA)'s 2011 titles continued the house's tradition of influencing national conversations and sparking public debate. Some of these titles follow:

  • Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother by Amy Chua (The Penguin Press) hit #2 on The New York Times hardcover nonfiction bestseller list, and was on that list for eleven weeks. Entertainment Weekly named the book one of its "Best of 2011" in the Top Memoirs and Biographies category. Rapid response to an extensive national media campaign as well as viral online publicity and marketing efforts came together in a perfect storm of media attention to drive a national debate about parenting.
  • Malcolm X by Manning Marable (Viking). Malcolm X was a National Book Award finalist and recently earned a National Book Critics Circle Award Nomination. The New York Times chose it as one of the top ten books of the year, Publishers Weekly selected it as a 2011 Best Book of 2011 in the nonfiction category, Amazon included it in its "Best Books of 2011," and The New Yorker's reviewers included it among their favorite books of the year. This critically acclaimed, definitive biography of the legendary black activist, which debuted at #3 on The New York Times hardcover nonfiction bestseller list, garnered an enormous wave of national media coverage, and national public discussion about new insights into Malcolm X's life and death, including the never-before-told true story of his assassination.
  • On China by Henry Kissinger (The Penguin Press). Drawing on forty years of intimate acquaintance with China and its leaders, the Nobel Peace Prize winner reflected on how the country's past relations with the outside world illuminate its 21st century trajectory. Kissinger served as National Security Advisor and then Secretary of State under Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford, and has advised many other American presidents on foreign policy. The book hit The New York Times hardcover nonfiction bestseller list right out of the gate and stayed on that list for seven weeks.
  • Known and Unknown by Donald Rumsfeld (Sentinel). This long-awaited autobiography of the former U.S. Secretary of Defense generated extensive media attention across the country and debuted at #1 on The New York Times hardcover nonfiction bestseller list. Rumsfeld has donated all proceeds from the sales of the book to the military charities supported by the Rumsfeld Foundation.
  • A History of the World in 100 Objects by Neil MacGregor (Viking). From the Director of the British Museum, this compelling portrait of mankind's evolution told through objects became a The New York Times bestseller. The book was named one of the top ten best nonfiction books of 2011 by Amazon and was one of the most coveted gifts of the 2011 holiday season.
  • Moonwalking with Einstein by Joshua Foer (The Penguin Press) was on The New York Times hardcover nonfiction bestseller list for eight weeks, reaching #2, and spent more than 100 days in the Top 100 on Amazon. The book was also named one of the top ten best nonfiction books of 2011 by Amazon and one of Michiko Kakutani's Top Ten Books of the Year. Published in the spring of 2011, it continues to sell strongly.
  • A Singular Woman by Janny Scott (Riverhead), the critically acclaimed, The New York Times hardcover bestseller, a deeply reported and researched biography of President Obama's mother by the former The New York Times reporter, was chosen by Time magazine as one of the publication's Top Ten Nonfiction Books of the Year.
  • The Psychopath Test by Jon Ronson (Riverhead). Renowned journalist Jon Ronson's The New York Times bestseller delved into the gripping, bizarre, and hilarious world of psychopaths. The book was named one of Publishers Weekly's Best Books of 2011 in the nonfiction category and one of Amazon's "Best Books of 2011."
  • The Quest by Daniel Yergin (The Penguin Press, September). This long-awaited successor to Yergin's Pulitzer Prize—winning The Prize provided an essential, overarching narrative of global energy, the principal engine of geopolitical and economic change. The Quest was named one of The New York Times' Top 100 Notable Books of 2011.
  • The Secret Knowledge: On the Dismantling of American Culture by David Mamet (Sentinel). Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright David Mamet, a self-described "former liberal," challenged the current state of American politics and government policy in his controversial The New York Times bestseller.

11. Delivered strong results across its core imprints

The scope and depth of Penguin Group (USA)'s publishing programs can be attributed to the talent, skill, and commitment of the company's individual creative teams.

G. P. Putnam's Sons had an industry-leading 34 The New York Times hardcover bestsellers, more than any individual hardcover imprint, such as new titles from Tom Clancy, Patricia Cornwell, Katherine Stockett, Robert B. Parker, Clive Cussler, Nora Roberts/J.D. Robb, John Sandford, Sue Grafton, Robert Crais, Betty White, Catherine Coulter, Stuart Woods, Amanda Quick, Alex Berenson, W.E.B. Griffin, Jayne Ann Krentz, and others.

  • Amy Einhorn Books/Putnam placed a debut novelist on The New York Times bestseller list for the third straight year, with The Weird Sisters by Eleanor Brown hitting the hardcover fiction bestseller list in February 2011. This follows the New York Times-bestselling success of 2010's The Postmistress by Sarah Blake and the 2009 debut of The Help by Kathryn Stockett. You Know When the Men Are Gone by Siobhan Fallon was selected for the 10th Annual Mayor's Book Club for Austin, TX and recognized by numerous other influential groups. What Alice Forgot by Liane Moriarty was embraced by women's magazines O, People, Self, Good Housekeeping, Family Circle, Ladies' Home Journal, and Woman's World.

Dutton had 11 bestsellers in 2011, meaning 25 percent of their titles hit The New York Times list. On the fiction side this included the fourth consecutive #1 hardcover fiction bestseller from Harlan Coben, two titles from Jennifer Chiavarini, and new titles from Linda Fairstein, Tami Hoag, Julie Garwood, among others. On the nonfiction side, Dutton had three bestsellers with It Gets Better, Turn Right at Machu Picchu, and The Sourcefield Investigations. The Great Stagnation, an eSpecial written by Tyler Cowen, was a The New York Times bestseller and was called "the most debated nonfiction book so far this year" by David Brooks in The New York Times. The Great Stagnation was Penguin's first eSpecial to become a The New York Times eBook bestseller.

Viking had 13 The New York Times bestsellers, including Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention by Manning Marable, a finalist for the National Book Award; Caleb's Crossing, a new work of fiction from Pulitzer Prize—winning author Geraldine Brooks; debut novels from Deborah Harkness (A Discovery of Witches) and Amor Towles (Rules of Civility); Neil MacGregor's A History of the World in 100 Objects; and Steven Pinker's The Better Angels of Our Nature: Why Violence Has Declined, one of Amazon's "Best Books of 2011." Viking also had three cover reviews in The New York Times Book Review in one month. The New York Times selected Chango's Beads and Two-Tone Shoes by William Kennedy, Moby-Duck by Donovan Hohn, and Pauline Kael: A Life in the Dark by Brian Kellow, along with three other Viking titles, as Notable Books of 2011.

  • Pamela Dorman Books/Viking received awards and recognition for its debut fiction in 2011. Saving Ceecee Honeycutt by Beth Hoffman hit The New York Times bestseller list, The Solitude of Prime Numbers by Paolo Giordano won last year's Quality Paperback Book Club New Voices Award, and 22 Britannia Road by Amanda Hodgkinson was chosen by Amazon as one of the "Best Books of 2011."

The Penguin Press published the winner of the 2011 Pulitzer Prize for Biography, Washington: A Life by Ron Chernow, and 40 percent of its 2011 titles made the printed or extended The New York Times bestseller list, with Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother by Amy Chua, Moonwalking with Einstein by Joshua Foer, The Quest by Daniel Yergin, Civilization by Niall Ferguson, and On China by Henry Kissinger among them. The New York Times' 100 Notable Books of 2011 included five Penguin Press titles, including Believing is Seeing by Errol Morris, The Memory Chalet by Tony Judt, and George F. Kennan: An American Life by John Lewis Gaddis.

Riverhead had three The New York Times hardcover bestsellers—A Singular Woman by Janny Scott, Unfamiliar Fishes by Sarah Vowell, and The Psychopath Test by Jon Ronson — as well as four trade paperback bestsellers, including Daniel Pink's Drive. Chang-Rae Lee's The Surrendered won the Dayton Literary Peace Prize, the third time in five years a Riverhead author won the award. Every year, Riverhead publishes a diverse group of writers: in 2011, an author they discovered when she was 24 years old, Danielle Evans (Before You Suffocate Your Own Fool Self) was selected as a 5 Under 35 writer by the National Book Foundation; the same year, they published a debut novel by 80-year-old Jamil Ahmad (The Wandering Falcon), which is now a finalist for the Man Asian literary prize. Novels The Grief of Others by Leah Hager Cohen and Mr. Fox by Helen Oyeyemi were both selected as The New York Times Notable Books of 2011.

Berkley/NAL led the industry in The New York Times mass market bestsellers and landed 101 titles on The New York Times bestseller lists across multiple formats in 2011, such as new titles from Charlaine Harris, Nora Roberts, Laurell K. Hamilton, and Jim Butcher. Roc had a The New York Times hardcover bestseller by Anne Bishop. Catherine Anderson's Here to Stay (Signet) was among Berkley/NAL's mass market original bestsellers. Obsidian, NAL's mystery imprint, scored its first national bestseller. Berkley/NAL was also successful in the trade paperback format, with The Help by Kathryn Stockett and The Postmistress by Sarah Blake. Two NAL authors, Karen White and Chloe Neill, made their first ever appearances on The New York Times trade paperback fiction list this year, each hitting the list twice .

Penguin Books had 11 The New York Times bestsellers, including titles from Elizabeth Gilbert, Tana French, Ron Chernow, Nathaniel Philbrick, and Danielle Trussoni. Penguin Classics celebrated its 65th Anniversary this year, culminating in a nation-wide giveaway of Classics-based skateboard decks, as well as special publishing programs and deluxe editions from Penguin and Penguin Classics, like Penguin Threads, Hardcover Classics, and the Great Food series.

Gotham Books earned five The New York Times bestsellers, including Michael Oher's I Beat the Odds, Just My Type by Simon Garfield, and Sweetness: The Enigmatic Life of Walter Payton by Jeff Pearlman, Super Rich by Russell Simmons, and The Wealth Cure by Hill Harper. Just My Type was chosen as one of Amazon's "Best Books of 2011."

Plume had three The New York Times bestsellers with You Might Be a Zombie and Other Bad News by the staff of Cracked.com, Remarkable Creatures by Tracy Chevalier, and Leonard Maltin's Movie Guide. Plume also had great success with original fiction such as Sarah Jio's debut, The Violets of March, which is now in its seventh printing.

12. Outstanding success and growth across its niche imprints

Portfolio, the dedicated business book imprint, had its most successful year yet with seven The New York Times bestsellers, including Paul Allen's Idea Man and Guy Kawasaki's Enchantment. Other acclaimed books included the Wall Street Journal bestsellers Currency Wars by James Rickards, Car Guys Vs. Bean Counters by Bob Lutz, and The Education of Millionaires by Michael Ellsberg. Portfolio also worked closely with its sister imprint in London, as Portfolio UK grew rapidly from six titles in 2010 to 21 in 2011. Some of those books were simultaneous global publications across Penguin Group.

Sentinel, established in 2003 as a conservative imprint, also had its best year ever with three The New York Times bestsellers, including Donald Rumsfeld's memoir Known and Unknown, which debuted at #1 on the hardcover nonfiction list, with all author proceeds going to veterans' charities. Other major Sentinel authors included former presidential candidate Mike Huckabee (A Simple Government) and Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright David Mamet (The Secret Knowledge).

Celebra, devoted to books on or by Hispanic celebrities since being launched in 2008, held the #1 spot on the US Spanish-language bestseller list for twelve consecutive weeks, starting in 2010 and continuing into 2011 with Ricky Martin's Yo, a feat not matched by any other publisher of Spanish-language books in the U.S.

Perigee had a The New York Times hardcover bestseller with Goldie Hawn's 10 Mindful Minutes. The bestselling Book of Useless Information series by Noel Botham passed one million copies sold. Perigee also released its first-ever iPhone/iPad app, Wreck This App, an interactive adaptation of Keri Smith's bestselling book Wreck This Journal, which was chosen as Gizmodo's App of the Week at publication. This app has been ported to Android, making it available in the Google Marketplace and for the Nook family of devices.

Avery had its first-ever #1 The New York Times bestseller, Clark Howard's Living Large In Lean Times, and its first backlist The New York Times bestseller, Prevent and Reverse Heart Disease by Dr. Caldwell Esselstyn, Jr.

Tarcher, which was founded more than 35 years ago, continues to prosper, focusing on health, psychology, and philosophy books, and had two 2011 The New York Times bestsellers: The Internet Is a Playground by David Thorne and Transcendence: Healing and Transformation Through Transcendental Meditation by Dr. Norman Rosenthal. Three Tarcher books are currently finalists for the Books for a Better Life award, and four have received Nautilus Gold Awards. The Nautilus Awards choose books that "promote spiritual growth, conscious living, and positive social change."

Hudson Street Press's The Longevity Project by Drs. Howard Friedman and Leslie Martin earned a Books for a Better Life Award nomination in the wellness category and garnered major national media. 30 Lessons for Living by Karl Pillemer had strong sales and also enjoyed major attention. Other HSP books that posted strong and steady sales in 2011 were Succeed by Heidi Halvorson and The Dyslexic Advantage by Drs. Brock and Fernette Eide.

Among its Young Readers imprints:

Viking Children's Books had six The New York Times bestsellers, including Sarah Dessen's What Happened to Goodbye, Madeline at the White House by John Bemelmans Marciano, and three Llama Llama books from Anna Dewdney (appearing on the picture book bestseller list at the same time).

Dutton Children's Books had five The New York Times bestsellers, including John Grisham's Theodore Boone: The Abduction, Gayle Forman's Where She Went, and two books by Ally Condie, Matched, and Crossed. Both The Abduction and Matched hit #1.

Philomel had ten The New York Times bestsellers, including the final installment in John Flanagan's Rangers Apprentice series, Halt's Peril, as well as the first book in his new Brotherband Chronicles series, The Outcasts. Also hitting the bestseller list was Eric Carle's first new book in five years, The Artist Who Painted a Blue Horse, and Ruta Sepetys' acclaimed debut novel Between Shades of Gray, which was a The New York Times Notable Children's Book of 2011, a Wall Street Journal Best Children's Book of 2011, and the iTunes 2011 Rewind Best Teen Novel of the Year.

Razorbill had six The New York Times bestsellers: the paperback edition of Jay Asher's Thirteen Reasons Why at #1; Richelle Mead's Last Sacrifice, the final book in Vampire Academy series which hit #1 on the New York Times, USA Today and Wall Street Journal bestseller lists, and Bloodlines; Kathy Reichs' Seizure; and Beth Revis' Across the Universe and Jenny Slate and Dean Fleischer Camp's Marcel the Shell with Shoes On: Things About Me. In addition Razorbill added Razorbill Productions, an offshoot of Razorbill created for new rights managed material.

Dial Books for Young Readers had three The New York Times bestsellers: Catherine Fisher's Sapphique, David Soman and Jacky Davis's Ladybug Girl and the Bug Squad, and Judy Schachner's Skippyjon Jones, Class Action, which hit #1 on the picture book bestseller list. Their award winners included Chime by Franny Billingsley, a National Book Award Finalist and Boston Globe-Horn Book Honor Winner; A Nation's Hope by Matt de la Pena and illustrated by Kadir Nelson, a The New York Times Best Illustrated Book of the Year; and The Returning by Christine Hinwood, a Printz Honor Winner.

13. Extended its digital publishing programs with new products, new platforms, and new partnerships

Throughout 2011, the company successfully launched new digital products, platforms, and publishing programs. Here are highlights:

Book Apps

Penguin saw great success with its apps program in 2011. Wreck This App, a unique digital product inspired by Keri Smith's bestselling Wreck this Journal, earned broad media praise and was chosen as Gizmodo's App of the Week at publication.

Early in 2012, Penguin's Atlas Shrugged app received the Publishing Innovation Award for best fiction app. The app, based on Ayn Rand's epochal 1957 novel, brings together the classic, unabridged text, and rarely-seen archival materials to add a new dimension to the reader's experience of the work, author's life, and philosophy, in a truly unique immersive literary experience.

Jack Kerouac's On the Road app, which features previously unreleased documents, exclusive photographs, rare audio files and family photographs, received international media praise when it was released in June and was also named a 2011 Staff Favorite by Apple. According to The Daily, "Penguin one-ups its e-reading competition … This photo filled app [is] richly designed by a team that knows its Kerouac."

In 2012, Penguin will expand the program further with the release of My Artist's Way Toolkit & App, which is based on Julia Cameron's bestselling book The Artist's Way, with daily inspiration, an interactive notebook, and weekly exercises and activities selected from Cameron's vast library. Penguin will also release apps based on The Very Hungry Caterpillar, Chopsticks, and other titles.

Amplified and Enhanced Editions

Penguin partnered with NBC News to produce two enhanced eBooks, D-Day by Antony Beevor, a bestselling backlist title considered to be the definitive book on the Battle for Normandy and Berlin 1961 by Frederick Kempe, which was called one of the best books of 2011 by The Economist, and. Both titles include rare, never before, seen footage as well as exclusive video introductions from NBC News personalities — Tom Brokaw (Berlin 1961) and David Gregory (D-Day).

Penguin also published enhanced movie tie-ins editions: John le Carre's Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy which includes film footage as well as a transcript of a rare interview with le Carré himself, in which he talks at length about George Smiley and the new film adaptation. George Moore's Albert Nobbs which includes a foreword by Glenn Close, the star of the film, and exclusive clips and stills from the film.

In 2012, Penguin will release an enhanced eBook of Manning Marable's Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention, featuring footage of both Malcolm X and author Manning Marable lecturing about Malcolm's remarkable life; rare photos; and an interactive map of Harlem as it was in Malcolm's day. Also to come this year is an amplified eBook of director Kevin Smith's Tough Sh*t, which contains all the stuff that can't be captured in a mere book: the audio and video of Kevin telling it like it is.

eSpecials

Penguin published 37 eSpecials in 2011, triple the number published in 2010. The Great Stagnation by Tyler Cowen hit The New York Times bestsellers list in February and was deemed "the most debated nonfiction book so far this year" by David Brooks in The New York Times.

In May 2011, Ace published Ilona Andrews's eSpecial, Magic Mourns, a novella previously published in a print anthology, and sold nearly 10,000 copies. It was one of the 25 eSpecials published in 2011 by the Berkley and NAL imprints. Core and niche imprints from across Penguin's adult and young readers divisions published eSpecials this year and continue to find content well-suited to this format.

Berkley and NAL have already scheduled twice as many eSpecials in 2012--most of them originals--as they published all of last year.

Book Country

Book Country, a subsidiary of Penguin that identifies new talent in genre fiction and is a community for writers to workshop and improve their fiction, launched its suite of self-publishing tools and services last November. Agents and editors are actively using the site as a place to look for new talent. Early in 2012, Ace Books announced the signing of a new urban fantasy series by Kerry Schafer, a writer discovered on Bookcountry.com. The two-book deal marks the first acquisition from the site since the Book Country community launched in May 2011.

14. David Shanks Honored as PW's "Person of the Year"

Penguin Group (USA) CEO David Shanks was named "2011 Person of the Year" in the U.S. trade book publishing industry by Publishers Weekly, the country's largest book publishing industry trade magazine. This prestigious honor and cover story recognized Shanks' leadership role in achieving record success and creative innovations for the company with its award-winning, bestselling books and authors while making the necessary investments and changes to build for the future.

15. Looking Ahead

Penguin Group (USA) has a strong lineup for 2012, including books coming from #1 New York Times—bestselling and award-winning authors, as well as internationally known celebrities.

Here are some 2012 highlights:

InterMix

The imprint strategy continues with the launch of InterMix, an e-initial eBook imprint from Berkley/NAL that will introduce original works from new authors as well as publish favorite titles from beloved authors—such as Nora Roberts—that are available as eBooks for the first time.

Fiction:

Tom Clancy (G. P. Putnam's Sons, June and November)
In Search and Destroy, due in June, Max Moore returns in the sequel to the #1 The New York Times bestseller, Against All Enemies.

In November, Clancy's All-Stars return to fight a terrorist menace in this sequel to The New York Times bestseller, Locked On.

Patricia Cornwell, The Bone Bed (G. P. Putnam's Sons, Fall)
The 20th Scarpetta novel from the world's #1 New York Times-bestselling crime writer. Following the disappearance of an eminent paleontologist from a dinosaur dig site in Alberta, Canada, Dr. Kay Scarpetta receives a grisly message that connects her to the case and matches her up against a powerful and cunning enemy.

Ken Follett, Winter of the World (Dutton, September)
The second installment of the Century Trilogy from #1 internationally bestselling author Ken Follett takes readers into the heroism and horror of World War II.

Charlaine Harris, Deadlocked (Ace Hardcover, May)
The twelfth and penultimate installment in Charlaine Harris's #1 The New York Times bestselling Sookie Stackhouse series.

Deborah Harkness, Shadow of Night (Viking, July)
The sequel to The New York Times bestseller A Discovery of Witches. Deborah Harkness has crafted a gripping journey through a world of alchemy, time travel, and magical discoveries, delivering one of the most hotly anticipated novels of the season.

Nora Roberts, The Witness (G. P. Putnam's Sons, April)
Called "America's favorite writer" by The New Yorker, #1 New York Times-bestselling author Nora Roberts is back with her 200th published novel featuring a new heroine and plotline.

Harlan Coben, Stay Close (Dutton, March)
Harlan Coben follows four consecutive #1 The New York Times bestsellers with a stand-alone thriller in the vein of his novels Caught and Hold Tight.

Clive Cussler, The Storm (G. P. Putnam's Sons, June)
A new novel from Cussler's #1 The New York Times bestselling NUMA Files series.

John Sandford, Stolen Prey (G. P. Putnam's Sons, May)
The new Lucas Davenport thriller from the #1 The New York Times bestselling author and Pulitzer Prize winner.

Elizabeth George, Believing The Lie (Dutton, January)
This January, Elizabeth George joined the Dutton list and debuted at #1 on The New York Times hardcover fiction bestseller list for the first time in her long and illustrious career.

Lisa Gardner, Catch Me (Dutton, February)
The latest installment in the Detective D.D. Warren series from a new addition to Dutton's list, New York Times-bestselling author Lisa Gardner. Catch Me debuted at #2 on The New York Times hardcover fiction, eBook fiction, and combined print and eBook fiction bestseller lists for the week of February 26. This is the highest Gardner has ever been on The New York Times bestseller list.

Valerie Plame and Sarah Lovett, Blowback (Blue Rider Press, November)
The first in a series featuring a female CIA analyst, Vanessa Pierson, co-created by Valerie Plame Wilson, the real-life CIA operative infamously betrayed by the Bush White House, written with suspense writer Sarah Lovett.

J.R. Ward, Lover Reborn (NAL Hardcover, March)
The tenth book in J.R. Ward's The New York Times bestselling Black Dagger Brotherhood series features vampire Tohr and his search for love after the ultimate heartbreak.

Literary Fiction:

Zadie Smith, NW (The Penguin Press. September)
International award-winning and bestselling Zadie Smith's NW brilliantly depicts the modern urban zone — familiar to city-dwellers everywhere — in a tragi-comic novel as mercurial as the city itself.

Junot Diaz, This Is How You Lose Her (Riverhead, Fall 2012)
From Pulitzer Prize-winning, The New York Times bestselling author of The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, a new collection of original short fiction, with themes of love, lust, and the joy and pain we inflict in their service.

Tana French, Broken Harbor (Viking, July)
The fourth novel of the Dublin murder squad by The New York Times bestselling author Tana French. With her signature blend of police procedural and psychological thriller, French's new novel creates her most complicated detective character and her best book yet.

Nonfiction:

Neil Young, Waging Heavy Peace (Blue Rider Press, November)
The literary/musical/pop culture memoir of the year: Neil Young tells his own story of one of the most remarkable careers in rock 'n' roll.

Kofi Annan, Untitled Memoirs (The Penguin Press, September)
From former Secretary-General of the United Nations and Nobel Peace Prize winner Kofi Annan, an unparalleled, intimate memoir of global statecraft during one of the most consequential eras of recent history.

David Nasaw, The Patriarch (The Penguin Press, November)
Celebrated historian David Nasaw brings to life the story of Joseph` Patrick Kennedy, in this, the first and only biography based on unrestricted and exclusive access to the Joseph P. Kennedy papers.

Steve Coll, Private Empire: ExxonMobil and American Power (The Penguin Press, May)
Two-time Pulitzer Prize winner Steve Coll goes deep inside ExxonMobil Corp, the largest and most powerful private corporation in the United States.

Kevin Phillips, 1775: A Good Year for Revolution (Viking, December)
In 1775, The New York Times bestselling author and former White House strategist, Kevin Phillips, gives readers a fresh view of the critical shifts and strategies of that tumultuous year.

General Stanley McChrystal, My Share of the Task (Portfolio, November)
The former commander of U.S. forces in Afghanistan offers a candid account of his sometimes controversial career, as well as deep insight into authentic leadership and organizational transformation.

Stacy London, Style By Fire (Viking, October)
Told through her personal battles with self-esteem, and the stories of real women made over, the popular co-host of televisions What Not to Wear, faces down the beliefs that hold women back from dressing well and feeling good about themselves.

Thomas E. Ricks, The Generals: Military Leadership from World War II to Iraq (The Penguin Press, September)
From the #1 bestselling author of Fiasco and The Gamble, an epic history of the decline of American military leadership from World War II to Iraq.

Jen Lancaster, Jeneration X (NAL Hardcover, May)
Jen Lancaster, The New York Times bestselling memoirist and novelist, details her ongoing attempts to become an (reluctant) adult—from buying her first house to getting her first mammogram to volunteering at a soup kitchen to deciding not to have kids.

James Carville and Stan Greenberg, It's the Middle Class, Stupid (Blue Rider Press, June)
Destined to make waves during the presidential campaign, political guru James Carville and pollster extraordinaire Stan Greenberg relate some inconvenient truths — that America's voters are not as dumb as elected officials think they are, and that a little bit of backbone could avert a total Election Day turnover of our government.

Victor Cruz (Celebra, Summer)
The salsa dancing wide receiver for the 2012 Super Bowl winning New York Giants tells his own story. The book will be released in both English and Spanish.

Marco Rubio, An American Son (Sentinel, October)
The Cuban-American senator recounts his parents' story as working class immigrants, and his own unlikely rise in Florida politics and his underdog run for the U.S. Senate.

Joan Rivers, I Hate Everyone…Starting With Me (Berkley Hardcover, June)
Comedian Joan Rivers is opinionated—especially when it comes to things she hates. In her latest book, Rivers takes aim at ugly children, dating rituals, funerals, lousy restaurants, and even herself.

Vanessa and Helen Williams, You Have No Idea (Gotham, April)
An inspirational mother-daughter memoir of family, fame, trials, and triumph by superstar Vanessa Williams and her mother Helen Williams.

Betty Edwards, Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain (Tarcher, April)
This is the definitive 4th edition of Drawing on the Right Side of the Brain, which has been translated into 17 languages and has sold more than 1.7 million copies in the US alone. Edwards has fully revised this new edition with the latest science on brain plasticity and the development of childhood creativity.

Young Readers:

John Green, The Fault in Our Stars (Dutton Children's Books, January)
From the Printz Award-winning, New York Times-bestselling author, THE FAULT IN OUR STARS will cause readers to reexamine how sickness and health, life and death, can define one person's legacy, something that we all leave behind.

John Grisham, Theo Boone #3 (Dutton Children's Books, May)
Filled with the intrigue and page-turning suspense that made John Grisham a #1 international bestseller, Theodore Boone's latest adventure as a thirteen-year-old lawyer will have Theo facing his biggest challenge yet.

Harlan Coben, Shelter #2 (G. P. Putnam's Sons Books for Young Readers, September)
The second book in Harlan Coben's Mickey Bolitar series builds on the suspense that readers fell for in Shelter, the international bestselling author's YA debut. Packed with thrills, humor, and intrigue, this book has all the signature elements that has readers of all generations flocking to Coben's work.

Elizabeth George, The Edge of Nowhere (Viking Juvenile, September)
Bestselling author Elizabeth George makes her debut in the young adult market with this suspenseful coming of age story, the first in a series to follow a group of teenagers over four years.

Ally Condie, Matched #3 (Dutton Children's Books, November)
The long-anticipated conclusion to the New York Times-bestselling Matched trilogy follows Cassia as she faces the ultimate choices—Society or the Rising, Xander or Ky.

Richelle Mead, The Golden Lily (Razorbill, June)
The second thrilling installment in Richelle Mead's Vampire Academy spinoff series explores all the friendship, romance, battles, and betrayals that made its predecessor a #1 bestselling hit. In The Golden Lily the drama is hotter, the romances are steamier, and the stakes are even higher.

Meg Rosoff, There Is No Dog by (G.P. Putnam's Sons Books for Young Readers, January)
Printz Award-winning author Meg Rosoff returns to the young adult marketplace with a provocative and imaginative novel starring God as a teenage boy.

Andrea Cremer, Bloodrose (Philomel, January)
The conclusion to The New York Times bestselling Nightshade trilogy.

Digital Products:

Berkley and NAL have already scheduled twice as many eSpecials in 2012—most of them originals—as they published all of last year.

In 2012, Penguin will expand the program further with the release of My Artist's Way Toolkit & App, which is based on Julia Cameron's bestselling book The Artist's Way, with daily inspiration, an interactive notebook, and weekly exercises and activities selected from Cameron's vast library. Penguin will also release apps based on The Very Hungry Caterpillar, Chopsticks, and other titles.

In 2012, Penguin will release an enhanced eBook of Manning Marable's Malcolm X: A Life of Reinvention, featuring footage of both Malcolm X and author Manning Marable lecturing about Malcolm's remarkable life; rare photos; and an interactive map of Harlem as it was in Malcolm's day. Also to come this year is an amplified eBook of director Kevin Smith's Tough Sh*t, which contains all the stuff that can't be captured in a mere book: the audio and video of Kevin telling it like it is.

16. Penguin Worldwide

Around the world, Penguin delivered a strong performance in its major and emerging markets.

Penguin UK had another outstanding year, growing its market share from 10.3% to 10.9%, in spite of a tough trading environment. It secured 78 top ten bestsellers including two of the bestselling titles across the entire industry with Jamie Oliver's 30-Minute Meals (1.7 million since publication) and Dawn French's A Tiny Bit Marvellous (460,000 copies sold), representing an increase of 15 on 2010. For the second year in succession, Penguin topped three of the five Christmas Bestseller charts with the phenomenal sales of Diary of a Wimpy Kid, the fastest selling title of 2011 selling 300,000 copies, and Jamie's Great Britain (over 400,000 copies sold) which was the overall Christmas number one. Penguin UK Children's grew its UK market share again to secure 16.6% of the market, holding on to its position as number one and claiming the 'Children's Publisher of the Year' title in the process.

Penguin Canada increased its market share despite tough market conditions and continued to dominate the bestseller lists. Highlights included The Help which was the number one bestselling fiction title in Canada selling nearly 500,000 copies. Neil Pasricha's Awesome franchise continued to dominate Canada's non-fiction charts with the three titles selling over 150,000 titles in 2011. Stieg Larsson sales continued to be very significant with lifetime sales of the three books now exceeding 1.5 million copies. On the awards front, Philip Roth, who is published by Hamish Hamilton in Canada, was awarded the International Man Booker Prize and Zsuzsi Gartner's Better Living Through Plastic Explosives was a finalist for Canada's most prestigious literary award, the Scotiabank Giller Prize.

DK had an excellent 2011, following a highly successful 2010, growing market share in both the US and the UK in spite of tough market conditions. DK continued the transfer of some editorial activities to India enhancing its margin in 2011. The Children's business performed particularly strongly on both sides of the Atlantic. The licensing business showed vigorous recovery in markets such as Brazil, Mexico, Japan, China and Central Europe. DK's phenomenally successful LEGO® titles continued to populate the bestseller lists around the world.

Penguin Australia grew its market share despite an extremely challenging trading environment including the bankruptcy of the REDGroup, the largest Australian book chain. Penguin Australia published the top two bestselling titles across the industry in 2011 with Jamie Oliver's 30-Minute Meals and Jeff Kinney's Cabin Fever. It hit the number one spot on the bestseller lists 24 times during the course of 2011.

Penguin India delivered significant sales growth fuelled by a strong publishing program and strength in the direct marketing channel. Mass market fiction and nonfiction was the emerging trend of the year with Penguin achieving great success in this category with authors including Ravinder Singh, Chanchaldeep Singh Sadhu, Yaana Gupta and Prakash Iyer. Penguin broke the 100,000 copy barrier for the first time with Ravinder Singh's Can Love Happen Twice? In 2012 Penguin India celebrates its 25th anniversary with a range of high-profile publishing and marketing events.

Penguin China launched a new English-language publishing program and achieved its first number one bestseller in English with Midnight in Peking. Through its joint venture partnership with 99 Readers, Penguin published twenty classics in Chinese. In 2012 Penguin will publish its first major acquisition of a title for Chinese publication, international tennis star Li Na's autobiography.

 

Penguin Group (www.penguin.com), one of the world's largest English-language trade book publishers, has established divisions and key market positions in the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, India, China, South Africa, New Zealand, and Ireland. The Penguin Group is part of Pearson plc, the international media company.

Contact:

Marilyn Ducksworth
(212) 366-2564
marilyn.ducksworth@us.penguingroup.com

Erica Glass
(212) 366-2951
erica.glass@us.penguingroup.com