Tag: awards

The New York Public Library this week announced its 2015 Library Lion honorees, including Penguin Press author and artist Maira Kalman.  Her new book, Beloved Dog, went on sale last week and continues to garner widespread attention and praise.  Last weekend, The Wall Street Journal published an insightful feature,  A Week in the Life of Maira Kalman.  Penguin Random House author Gloria Steinem was also honored as a Library Lion this year.
The Yasnaya Polyana Literary Award for the Best Foreign Novel of the 21st Century has been awarded to Viking/Penguin author Ruth Ozeki for A Tale for the Time Being .  The award ceremony for the 13th annual Yasnaya Polyana Literary Award, which was founded by the Leo Tolstoy Museum & Estate and Samsung Electronics, took place on Saturday (10/31) at the Bolshoi Theater in Moscow, Russia.  For the first time, the award included a category for Foreign Literature, making Yasnaya Polyana Russia’s first international literary award, and Ozeki the first international recipient. Ozeki and the novel’s Russian translator, Yekaterina Ilyina, will be awarded 1,000,000 and 200,000 rubles, respectively. A Tale for the Time Being, published in hardcover by Viking and in paperback by Penguin Books in the US,  is published in Russia by AST. During the award ceremony, Vladimir Tolstoy, great-great-grandson of author Leo Tolstoy and chairman of the Yasnaya Polyana prize committee, introduced Ozeki and compared A Tale for the Time Being to the novels by his great-great-grandfather: A Tale for the Time Being fascinated me with its humanity, very calm confidential tone and profound significance. The book is a dialogue between two continents, between two different civilizations, and everything in this book naturally merges into one story filled with compassion, personal involvement in others’ lives/destinies, the very humane attitude which connects Ruth Ozeki to Leo Tolstoy. Unconditional humanism is characteristic both of A Tale for the Time Being and of Leo Tolstoy’s works.” In her acceptance speech, Ozeki said,  “To receive this award, given by the Tolstoy estate, is an unimaginable honor, and I am deeply grateful. We writers like to take credit for connecting people with our stories, but actually human beings are already deeply and fundamentally connected, and our stories are simply an expression of this.  Literature affirms our connection with each other. Literature works because people enjoy this sense of basic human interconnectedness and find it inspiring.”
Avery’s New York Times bestseller Neurotribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity  by Steve Silberman won the 2015 Samuel Johnson Prize for Nonfiction,  and he was presented with the UK’s premier prize for nonfiction books at a ceremony in London on Monday evening.NeuroTribes is the first work of science to win the prestigious British award in its 17-year history, and comes at a time of growing public awareness of the neurodevelopmental “disorder” that affects millions of people around the world.  The coverage has been incredible, both in the US and across the world.  The New York Times credits Silberman for writing “a book that challenges readers to think differently about autism” and The Independent reports that Silberman’s book will change the way we understand what Steve, in The Guardian, eloquently insists is not a condition but “a human community.”  Other media reporting on the win includes Financial Times, BBC News , Reuters, and Toronto Samual JohnsonStar. Meanwhile, the Associated Press article (which was tweeted out to their 5.99 million followers!) has so far been picked up by Miami Herald, Washington Post, Arizona Daily Star, Sacramento Bee, Houston Chronicle, Austin American Statesman, Seattle Times, Minneapolis Star Tribune, Newsday, ABC News, Yahoo News, SFGate, and so many more.
Jan Karon, author of Putnam’s #1 New York Times bestseller, Come Rain or Come Shine, was honored with the Library of Virginia’s Lifetime Achievement Award this past weekend. The award recognizes a Virginian who has made an outstanding and long-lasting contribution to literature. Previous Lifetime Achievement Award winners include Edgar Allan Poe, Booker T. Washington, and John Grisham. Ms. Karon was the featured speaker at the library’s literary luncheon, where she was jankaroninterviewed by Sandy Treadway, the Librarian of Virginia, and she was presented the award at a ceremony that took place Saturday night in Richmond.  Putnam President Ivan Held and VP Executive Editor Christine Pepe (pictured here with Ms. Karon) attended the award ceremony to celebrate her achievement, as well as the close of her successful book tour that included two bookseller events in Richmond. Ms. Karon wrote her first novel when she was 10 years old, the same year she won a short-story contest organized by the local high school. At age 50, she left a career in advertising to be an author and her first series of books began as a weekly installment in her local newspaper. Eventually she published At Home in Mitford, her first novel, which has been reprinted more than 80 times and nominated three times for an ABBY (American Booksellers Book of the Year Award). Her novels have also won the Christy and Gold Medallion awards for outstanding contemporary fiction and the Library of Virginia’s People’s Choice Award for Fiction. Her two most recent Mitford novels both were very successful: Somewhere Safe with Somebody Good, spent 17 weeks on The New York Times bestseller list, and Come Rain or Come Shine debuted at #1 on The New York Times bestseller list on October 11. A special hardcover gift edition of  At Home in Mitford will be released on October 27. She is also the author of 13 other books, including two Father Tim novels, a cookbook, and several books for children.
Edgar Award-winning author Alex Marwood won a Macavity Award in the category of Best Mystery Novel for The Killer Next Door (Penguin Books, 10/28/14). Members of Mystery Readers International nominate and vote for the Macavity Awards, which were presented at this year’s Bouchercon on October 8. The Killer Next Door, which follows a group of neighbors from a dodgy London apartment building, has been optioned by James Franco and Ahna O’Reilly for a movie adaptation.  Warm congratulations, Alex.  Pictured, left to right: Viking/Penguin authors Neely Tucker, Alex Marwood and Elizabeth Little with Ben Petrone of Viking/Penguin publicity at Bouchercon.Alexmarwood  
The 2015 National Book Awards finalists were announced this week and two books published by the Penguin Publishing Group are in the running for prizes.  Fates and Furies by Lauren Groff (Riverhead Books) is on the Fiction shortlist. How to be Drawn by Terrance Hayes (Penguin Books) is a finalist in the Poetry category.  He won the National Book Award for Poetry in 2010 for his collection, Lighthead. Congratulations and best of luck to Lauren and Terrance as well as their publishers and everyone involved with these highly praised titles. The winners will be announced at the National Book Awards Ceremony, which takes place Wednesday, November 18 in New York.
Riverhead author Marlon James took home the 2015 Man Booker Prize for his “absorbing and compelling novel“ (Reuters) A Brief History of Seven Killings. On Tuesday, James was presented with the trophy and a £50,000 prize by Camilla Parker-Bowles, the Duchess of Cornwall, in a ceremony at Guildhall in London. James is the first Jamaican ever to be awarded the Prize and Chair of the Judges Michael Wood calls the novel “an extraordinary book…It was a book we didn’t actually have any difficulty deciding on—it was a unanimous decision.”  Set in Kingston, Jamaica, where the author was born, the book is a fictional history of the attempted murder of Bob Marley in 1976.  Awarded annually, the Man Booker Prize is open to fiction writers of any nationality writing in English, and published in the U.K. A Brief History of Seven Killings has been called “epic in every sense of that word”New York Times critic Michiko Kakutani, a “tour de force” by the Wall Street Journal, and “thrilling and ambitious” by the Los Angeles Times. Congratulations to Marlon James and his Riverhead colleagues as well as everyone involved with this award-winning book.
Celeste Ng’s Everything I Never Told You (Penguin Press/Penguin Books) has been awarded the 2015 Massachusetts Book Award for Fiction. The Massachusetts Book Awards recognize significant works of fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and children’s/young adult literature published by Commonwealth residents or about Massachusetts subjects. The shortlist for this award also included authors Bret Anthony Johnston, Anita Diamant, Ward Just, Annie Weatherwax, and Randy Susan Meyers. The full announcement can be read  here.
Anne M. Fletcher’s Inside Rehab: The Surprising Truth About Addiction Treatment — and How to Get Help That Works, published by Penguin Books in 2014, is a Bronze Award winner for the 2015 National Health Information Awards in the category of Patient Education Information. The National Health Information Awards honors the nation’s best consumer health information programs and materials, including books, newspaper and magazine articles, and other media.
The longlist for the Samuel Johnson Prize for Nonfiction has been announced and includes Steve Silberman’s  NeuroTribes:The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity  (Avery).   The Samuel Johnson Prize for Nonfiction is the UK’s premier prize for nonfiction books. The prize aims to reward the best of nonfiction and is open to authors of all nonfiction books in the areas of current affairs, history, politics, science, sport, travel, biography, autobiography and the arts. The shortlist will be announced on October 11 at London’s Southbank Centre as part of the London Literature Festival. The winner of the 2015 Samuel Johnson Prize will be announced on November 2.


, Avery